Tag Archives: Economics

WSJ gets in my head

Beautifully stated: Inside the Cold, Calculating Libertarian Mind

“Government is the embodiment of rights violation – it cannot function otherwise. Taxation violates property rights, extending imagined rights to others violates liberty (the patient may be getting a “right”, but ask the doctor if he isn’t a slave), and any refusal to comply will ultimately lead to government violating the right to life.”

Still think voting for Barry or Mitt is smart?

FEAR

I’ve become a regular listener of Joe Rogan’s podcast over the past month. The most recent episode featured comedian Bryan Callen and a good chunk was a discussion about fear and its relationship with success. For the uninitiated, Rogan’s podcast is not really a comedy show despite the host and most guests hailing from that world. It’s very long form, averaging two and a half to three hours and covers a myriad of topics. Callen brought up a book in the works by a psychologist friend of his who has counseled athletes and corporate execs and other folks in high intensity careers. [Sidenote: Callen is incredibly interesting.]

There was one anecdote Callen was relating that really stuck out for me. He asked the doc what is the most common hurdle faced by the CEOs and other high powered businessmen he’s had therapy with. He said they all are afraid of being discovered as frauds; that somehow they lucked into their position and are in over their heads.

That is fucking fascinating. Think about that for a minute.

With very, very few exceptions (and it’s not going to be the guys seeking professional counseling) none of these guys were handed the keys to a Fortune 500 company. God did not simply smile on them and they wound up there. It seems to me that they all possess a level of humility beyond what would be expected. Sheeeit, there are girls on Twitter that never finished high school with bigger egos.

Contrast that with the assholes in Congress and the last, oh I don’t know, 30 presidents. Every single one of those dicks thinks they have some right to be there. Obama is a glaringly obvious example of this mentality. For chrissakes he’d written two (2!!!) autobiographies before he even ran for President. And yet the chairman of Chevron’s board is worried he’s not qualified for his job.

This is the big reason why it’s not now and never will be about “just getting the right people in office.” I used to naïvely believe that. Then I finished the 11th grade and used my brain. The people who want to be in politics are never the people who should be in politics. You don’t willingly give a tyrant power; you do everything you can to keep them from obtaining it.

I’ve got more on this, stay tuned.

How many feminists does it take to change a light bulb?

12.

One to screw it in,
one to excoriate men for creating the need for illumination,
one to blame men for inventing such a faulty means of illumination,
one to suggest the whole “screwing” bit to be too “rape-like”,
one to deconstruct the lightbulb itself as being phallic,
one to blame men for not changing the bulb,
one to blame men for trying to change the bulb instead of letting a woman do it,
one to blame men for creating a society that discourages women from changing light bulbs,
one to blame men for creating a society where women change too many light bulbs,
one to advocate that lightbulb changers should have wage parity with electricians,
one to alert the media that women are now “out-lightbulbing” men,
and one to just sit there taking pictures for her blog for photo-evidence that men are unnecessary.

Ding, Dong, the Witch Is Dead!

President Obama’s “bipartisan health care summit” that was announced during an interview on the Super Bowl pre-game show will be held Thursday. “I want to come back and have a large meeting, Republicans and Democrats, to go through systematically all the best ideas that are out there and move it forward,” Mr. Obama said in the interview from the White House Library.

Yesterday the President released his updated reform proposals and posted them to the White House website. The bullet points supposedly show that the proposal “puts American families and small business owners in control of their own health care.”

In reality, the proposal would put the federal government in control of health insurance (which is not at all the same as health care). It would make it a federal crime for people to not buy insurance, or for insurers to offer plans that did not meet expensive federal mandates (such as insuring “children” up to the age of 26.) The only families who would remain in control are those exempted from compulsory insurance because they can’t afford it. But I thought that was the reason why people are not insured today?

The new blueprint is almost exactly the same as the House and Senate health care bills that the public have opposed since July. It mostly just splits the difference between the two. This is fantastic news and for those who view politics as nothing more than farcical theater, another great source of amusement.
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“Climate Change”

Weep for Your Country

From Cato:

Since today (12/15)  is Bill of Rights Day, it seems like an appropriate time to pause and consider the condition of the safeguards set forth in our fundamental legal charter.Let’s consider each amendment in turn.

The First Amendment says that Congress “shall make no law … abridging the freedom of speech.” Government officials, however, insist that they can make it a crime to mention the name of a political candidate in an ad in the weeks preceding an election. They also insist upon gag orders in thousands of federal investigations.

The Second Amendment says the people have the right “to keep and bear arms.” Government officials, however, insist that they can make it a crime to keep and bear arms.

The Third Amendment says soldiers may not be quartered in our homes without the consent of the owners. This safeguard is doing so well that we can pause here for a laugh.

The Fourth Amendment says the people have the right to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures. Government officials, however, insist that they can storm into homes in the middle of the night after giving residents a few seconds to answer their “knock” on the door.

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Pabst Blue Ribbon: A Manifesto

Pabst Brewing Co., owner of Pabst Blue Ribbon, Schlitz, and other old-line beer brands, is on the sale block again.

Pabst’s owner, the Kalmanovitz Charitable Foundation, based in Mill Valley, Calif., has hired Bank of America Merrill Lynch to find a buyer willing to pay around $300 million, according to the New York Post, which cited unnamed sources in an article last week.

The sale effort is apparently the result of a deadline imposed by the Internal Revenue Service. Federal tax laws don’t allow charitable foundations to own for-profit companies.

The IRS initially gave the foundation until 2005 to sell Pabst. That deadline was extended to 2010 when a buyer couldn’t be found, according to a 2008 report by the Chicago Tribune.

Because Pabst doesn’t own breweries, it mainly operates as a marketing company, crafting strategies for selling dozens of brands, which also include Old Milwaukee, Stroh’s and Heileman’s Old Style. The company owns the brands and contracts out its brewing to Molson, the Canadian beer giant.

The Pabst Blue Ribbon label has made quite a comeback lately. For the four weeks ended July 12, the company saw its case sales increase 21 percent compared to a year earlier, giving it a three percent share in the high-volume sub-premium market.

This should come as no surprise to those of us who enjoy drinking great tasting beer but don’t exactly have the funds to keep a constant supply of Stone Arrogant Bastard Ale or Hoegaarden in our refrigerator. I’d like to take this opportunity to enlighten the W&J community about the wonderful merits of this American classic. Continue reading